Polling Day Info

The Police and Crime Commissioner Election takes place on Thursday 15 November. You can vote in person at your local Polling Station from 7am until 10pm.

Are you registered to vote?

To check if you are registered to vote phone your local council (enter your postcode here to find contact details) and ask for their election team who will be able to help you.

Lost your polling card or forgotten to post your postal vote? 

If you have lost your polling card you can still vote without it – just go to your local polling station and give your name and address, you may wish to take ID if you have it. You can also hand a completed postal vote envelope into a polling station.

If your polling card didn’t arrive and you are registered to vote then you can also still vote without it . If your postal vote didn’t arrive then you will need to have a replacement issued and hand that in to a polling station.

To get a replacement postal vote or an emergency proxy vote (e.g. for someone who is taken ill) then phone your local council (enter your postcode here to find contact details) as soon as possible and ask for their election team who will be able to issue replacements until 5pm on polling day.

Don’t know where to vote? 

Your polling card will tell you the location of your polling station. If you have lost your polling card but know where you normally go to vote in general or local elections then it is almost certainly the same for this election.

If you haven’t voted in the area before or the normal location isn’t being used as a polling station then phone your local council (enter your postcode here to find contact details) and they will be able to help.

What happens when you go into the polling station?

There maybe someone sitting just outside the polling station who asks for your electoral number or name and address – they are doing something called “telling”. This info is used to track voter turn out and also means that you shouldn’t be contacted later on to see if you have voted or plan to vote.

When you go into the polling station you will be asked for your electoral number or name and address and your attendance marked on the register. You will then be given your voting paper(s) and allowed to go into a polling booth and fill them in privately. If you have any questions or make a mistake just ask – the officials are there to help.

Once you have marked your ballot paper you should fold it in two (to keep your choices private), leave the polling booth and place your papers in the ballot box. And that’s it – all done!

How do you fill in your ballot paper?

The PPC election is being conducted using SV or the Supplementary Vote. The ballot paper allows you to cast 2 votes – your 1st and 2nd preferences – but you don’t have to use your 2nd preference vote if you don’t want to.

You can see what the ballot paper will look like here or there are short video clips that walk you through how to complete your ballot paper – standard video, welsh version or BSL version.

How will your vote be counted?

Using the Supplementary Vote or SV approach has 2 steps:

  1. To begin with the votes are counted with only 1st preferences are added up; if someone wins with over 50% of the vote then the election is over.
  2. If no-one has got 50% in that count then there is further count, in this case for the top 2 candidates where their votes are counted again but this time all of the 2nd preference votes from the candidates who were outside the top 2 are added in as well. Whoever has the most votes on completion of this count has won.

So you can see a 1st preference vote is much more valuable than a 2nd preference vote!

Who is allowed to vote?

For the PCC elections anyone who is registered on the electoral role and fits the following criteria:

  • British citizen living in the UK
  • Commonwealth citizen living in the UK
  • Citizen of the Irish Republic living in the UK
  • European Union citizen living in the UK
  • Registered to vote as a Crown Servant
  • Registered to vote as a service voter

You cannot vote if you are a British citizen living abroad and registered as an overseas voter.

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